Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Beautiful SAGE Photo Story!

Picture
Ladybug on dill flowers.
Photo by: Hannah M.
This summer we were contacted by an amazing local high school student, Hannah.  She's a local photographer who had learned about SAGE by participating in the Parks and Recreation's Youth Volunteer Corps program a few years ago.  Hannah wanted to use her artistic talent to share with folks the story of SAGE produce; where it grows and where it goes.

Check out her photos and story here:
http://www.hannahmcintoshphotography.com/sage-photo-story.html

Hannah also does wedding photography, senior photos, family portraits, etc.

Thanks Hannah for helping share SAGE's story in such a beautiful way!

Lillie (summer garden intern) and Deanna (garden manager)
being goofy. Photo by: Hannah M.
     

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Meals on Wheels: A Piloted Partnership

Delivery for 2nd week of October: Each participant
received a box of cherry tomatoes, 2 large tomatoes,
1 cucumber and 1 green pepper.
Meals on Wheels -- I recently learned -- is a network of over 5,000 feeding programs that daily delivers 1 million ready-to-eat meals to seniors and those with disabilities.  Now we're partnering with our local chapter and helping evolve the model.  Not only are participants receiving ready-to-eat food, some are receiving fresh food from SAGE.

This fall we piloted a program with 15 Meals on Wheels participants who received a small array of produce each week.  Sort of a smaller scale CSA.  I tried to offer seniors a good variety of foods that are easy to prepare, store well and are relatively familiar.  After 5 weeks of deliveries, here are some comments from happy participants....

"I have so appreciated all the fresh produce you have given me.  Somehow, it seems to taste much better than store bought produce.  I truly think that this is because it shows how caring you are about the elderly and/or disabled people.  So, with all sincerity, thank you."

"I thank you so very much for the produce I received.  It was like a Christmas gift with surprises inside!"

Some of the "sweetest" cabbage growing
"I had the cabbage last night - the sweetest I had ever tasted!"  

Next year we're hoping to start the program earlier in the season and offer a bit of educational material for the more oddball items.  I'm excited about finding this new way to partner and collaborate to provide more of our community members with fresh, healthy produce.

Cheers,
Deanna
Garden Manager

Monday, November 19, 2012

Calico Corn



Amoreena, our Food Corps Service Member, snapped this photo when she was separating
kernels from cobs of popcorn grown in SAGE's Children's Garden
 
It is pouring today.  Not just the normal Oregon drizzle, but full on sheets of precipitation pounding down from the sky.  Well, I guess November had to arrive at some point....

Popcorn waiting to be shucked...
Just looks like normal corn until you
open it up!
Our beautiful popcorn!
It needs to dry on the cob
for a few weeks before we
can take off to kernels to pop them.
As I soggily trod around the garden this morning harvesting brassicas and loading up my bike panniers with winter squash and potatoes for the OSU Food Pantry, I was thinking how different the garden looks from not even a month ago.  Then, we still had tomatoes in the field, giant pumpkins to fill kids with glee and corn standing tall.  Now, most of those things went to people's bellies and the remaining plant matter is composting. I say most though, because we still have some popcorn that has been drying.  Our popcorn this year was beautiful.....9 or 10 feet tall (perfect for the corn maze!), colorful and delicious.  Popcorn doesn't take anymore garden work than normal corn (and sometimes less) and is a great thing to grow for a healthy, high fiber treat.  The thing about growing your own though is it doesn't come in a bag with directions!  So for those of you who may not know how to cook popcorn without a bag or popcorn machine, here are some easy directions.  Enjoy!

How to Cook Popcorn on your Stove Top:

1) Heat a Tbsp or two of oil (butter, coconut or veggie) in a pot over medium heat.
2) After a minute or two, when the oil is hot, add 2 Tbsp (for 1 - 2 people) on up to 1/2 cup of kernels to the oil.  Immediately cover with a lid and gently shake the pot to ensure all the kernels are coated with oil.
3) Wait a bit and soon the kernels will start popping!  Once the frequency of the popping starts to slow down, your popcorn is done.  You can easily burn it if you let it go too long...
4) Dress popcorn with your favorite toppings: butter, garlic powder, Braggs, nutritional yeast, salt, hot sauce, soy sauce and more....so many options!

Another beautiful picture from Amoreena.  

Monday, November 5, 2012

Work Party Season Wrap Up

Volunteer Randi once again
lending a hand
Last Tuesday was our final Tuesday evening work party of the season.  Just in time too with daylight savings shortening the hours of evening light!  A BIG thanks to the dedicated crew who came out to do one final weeding in the the mild evening and enjoy the harvesting of winter squash.  Sharing the evening with you all was really a wonderful way to conclude a season of work parties.  We have now have boxes full of winter squash to distribute throughout the winter.  The day after the work party, a delivery volunteer was able to take 140+ lbs of pumpkins to the food bank to give out for Halloween.  

Warty gourd, delicata squash and a
blue hubbard squash....all SAGE grown,
all amazing!
Now we're coasting for a bit.  Doing a lot of planning and more time in the office.  There is the harvesting of hardy greens (oh kale, how splendid you are!) and the chasing of ducks away from our spread cover crop seeds (I'm not very good at this as the ducks aren't afraid of much -- especially not a small blonde woman -- after a summer of being chased by kids and dogs), but overall there isn't a ton to do in the garden right now.    

As I walk through the garden now, my mind flickers to future plans and reflections on the past season.  This is a much different mentality than during the growing season when I was constantly creating and revising to-do (now!) lists in my head.  I thrive on being engaged and busy, but I must admit that with the shorter, darker days, my body and mind are appreciating that I'm heeding nature's cycle and taking things at a little slower pace.  It will feel a bit odd having a free Tuesday night....

Thanks for a great work party season!
Hope to see you all out at SAGE in the spring!
Cheers,
Deanna (Garden Manager)

Sunday, October 28, 2012

Season Finale of Tuesday Evening Work Parties

Come one, come all!  This coming Tuesday (October 30th) is our final Tuesday evening work party for the season.  We'll be out (most likely getting a bit wet!) from 4 - 6ish at SAGE.  We'll be completing a variety of different tasks to get SAGE all buttoned up for the winter.  To get you in the mood for a work party, I've picked a sampling of photos below from Tuesday work parties throughout this season that highlight the variety of projects we've worked on.  Hope to see you Tuesday!

Cheers,
Deanna (Garden Manager)

PS: For those of you already pondering what do to on Tuesday evenings next season, work parties will resume in late March/early April!
Many early work parties involved spreading at least a bit of
leaf mulch.

Tuesday evening superstar volunteers, Denise and Paige,
planting strawberries.  Planting, whether it was starts or seeds, happened all season long.

Early season harvest of mixed greens

Lark, another repeat volunteer extraordinaire,
doing a late season harvest of delicious Sungold cherry tomatoes.
As the warm weather crops ripened a good portion of work parties
became dedicated to harvesting time consuming items like
cherry tomatoes, green beans and tomatillos.

Just a couple of weeks ago, the warm weather
crops were chopped in, cover crop seed sprinkled and
straw mulch spread to prepare for winter

Monday, October 22, 2012

Sharing Our Rain

At the start of the day, all the crops were still in the ground
At the end of the day, all dead plant material cleared out,
cover crop seed spread and mulch on top.
(Note the rubberized rain suits!) 
"This group is full of talkers," an HP employee noted during the snack break of our Friday morning work party.  We had some of our solid HP volunteers who've been coming out all season (Ray, Yvonne, Shawn, Denise), but this particular work party was also full of folks from the HR department.  So yes, this was a more talkative work party than usual.  I'll attribute that to the fact that HR folks work with people and to enjoy working with people generally you have to know how to get along and communicate with them which can lead to chatting!  The reason I'm focusing on this aspect of the group is that on Friday morning it was POURING.  Not just the normal Oregon drizzle, but "get the bright yellow Cap Cod fishermen rubberized rain suits out" type of rain.  When it is those kind of conditions, it is good to be able to talk because it can distract you from the fact that your feet are wet or the uncomfortable feeling of being soaked through to your undergarments....

So that is what Mama Nature provided on the last HP work party of the season.  HP employees have been visiting the garden on a monthly basis since April of this season (they helped out last year too!) and each of the prior work parties was beautiful.  As we cleared and chopped up the beds of Solanaceae crops (tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, tomatillos), the rain softened the ground for us and then helped water the cover crop seeds we planted in the cleared space.  Now my only hope is that the roving packs of ducks haven't eaten all the seed!

Harvesting potatoes!
Thanks HP for committing to scheduling one employee work party a month (and for braving the rain this time around)!   Knowing I can count on your hard work in the garden makes my job easier and the more folks we have to collaborate on this project, the more healthy, local food we can provide to people in
Harvesting the last of the melons
need.  We look forward to seeing HP employees in the garden next season!



Cheers!
Deanna Lloyd
SAGE Garden Manager

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Frosting and Field Trips


Warm weather crops "triage" harvested after a light frost
This weekend was a surprise.  I woke up on Saturday morning thinking "Wow, it is cold, I hope it didn't frost!" and then promptly dismissed that thought as the weather report the previous evening said we were in the clear, no frost yet!  Well -- epiphany moment -- sometimes the weather reports are wrong.  Or, to give credit to the weather folks, there are just so many microclimates out there it is really hard to predict exactly what is going to happen where and they do their best to give us an approximate, overarching guess.

Tomatoes galore!

So back to Saturday morning....I pedaled out to SAGE and found a light frost had made our warm weather crops on the lower slope of the garden very sad looking.  Emergency messages went out to colleagues and Amoreena, our Garden Education Food Corps service member, arrived on the scene.  We harvested eggplants, peppers, cucumbers and tomatoes and then placed reemay (or floating row cover) over remaining warm weather crops to protect them until Monday morning when a couple classes of high schoolers were scheduled to come to the garden.


HS students helping fold
up floating row cover that
was protecting peppers

After a lot of hand wringing, worrying about the night time lows over the weekend, Monday morning dawned bright, clear and chilly.  We were happy to see that while some things looked sadder, the emergency measures we'd taken allowed us to have the rest of our warm weather crop plants stripped clean by 80 health students from Crescent Valley High School.  In addition to helping us harvest a lot of healthy, local food for hunger relief agencies, the students were also able to sample different veggies through a fun blindfold taste test relay race and a garden scavenger hunt.  The students are just starting their nutrition unit so the broad focus of this field trip was "real food is good." I'm glad to say that many of the students heartily agreed with that statement as they snacked on sweet Sungold cherry tomatoes, broccoli flowers and green beans.       

Now we're clearing out those beds and planting cover crops with OSU students.... 
High school students heading back to the bus after a fun, sunny morning in the garden

Thursday, September 27, 2012

Day of Caring and a Minor Crisis Averted


Samaritan Health volunteers with some of the 195.5lbs of SAGE produce they harvested!


Fresh Corn!
Friday, September 21st I got a frantic phone call from the South Corvallis Food Bank; "Deanna!  We thought we were going to have enough food leftover from Monday and Wednesday for distribution this weekend, but we're all out.....We have pounds of nothing!"  Luckily, Sept 21st there was a bustle of positive activity around Corvallis as it was United Way's Day of Caring.  Groups of gung-ho volunteers were out and about doing all sorts of projects for the betterment of our community.  We were lucky enough to have employees from Samaritan Health come help out at SAGE. 

Grapes!
Volunteers helped us clear green beans, whack back a section of invasives and of course, harvest! In fact, that was the largest single day harvest to date, nearly 250lbs of food total (with 195.5lbs being harvested by Sam Health for direct delivery to the South Corvallis Food Bank).  Immediate crisis of no food at the food bank averted.  Still working on relieving the more long term crisis of hunger in our community....   

Sungold Cherry Tomatoes!

Dinosaur Kale!
Thanks Samaritan Health for both your physical help in the garden and for being a sponsor of the Edible Corvallis Initiative!  

Thursday, September 20, 2012

A Few Fun Production Facts

Volunteer harvested produce getting ready to head
the South Corvallis Food Bank



This season we have a plethora of veggies going out to a variety of agencies.  We always track the weight of donated produce, but this year we're also tracking the approximate value (based on Safeway pricing of conventional produce).  We feel like using Safeway as an average is more realistic as that is a more likely place for clients of the different hunger relief agencies to shop.  This is one reason why we don't use organic produce prices or compare it to local produce at the co-op.  I can go into more detail if you're interested, but just that explanation ended up being longer winded than I expected.....what I really want to show you all was a couple of fun facts that Chris recently deciphered from our production spreadsheets.  


So far this year we've donated:
  • over a 1/4 ton of cabbage
  • nearly $1000 of kale
  • close to 300 heads of lettuce
  • almost 500 lbs of cucumbers

Row of purple cabbage growing

Another Fun Fact

  • upwards of 80 deliveries have been made by bike, amounting to more than 3000 lbs of produce delivered over 250 miles.....and that was a couple weeks ago and didn't include a lot of smaller trips we make!  
The season is still going full steam ahead with 100+lb deliveries going out every day!  We'll have more tallies as the season wraps up, but right now we're busy (and excited to be!) sharing this bounty with our community!  


Cheers, Deanna

Friday, September 7, 2012

Harvesting Time of the Year!

Ray throws freshly pciked green beans into the harvesting tub.  
This time of the year is delightful; the light starts to change, the weeds are less enthusiastic about filling in the blank spaces of the garden and we have a big bounty of produce to deliver to hunger relief agencies.  With work party volunteers lately we've been able to do substantial harvesting which everyone always enjoy (and is especially helpful to us as picking things like beans, tomatoes and tomatillos can be time consuming on your own!).   Just a couple of weeks ago, the Tuesday evening work party volunteers helped us harvest 120 pounds of produce to deliver to the South Corvallis Food Bank.  Any guess on how many pounds of beans are in the tub in photo above?   I'll give you a hit; the answer is 1/6th of the total poundage we harvested that night! That harvest was just one day, one delivery site.  A lot of produce is being distributed and we couldn't do it without all the hardwork of our volunteers (past, present and future!).

 
In addition to harvesting, we've also spent time getting crops ready for fall and winter.  Top dressing established kale as well as planting winter crop transplants (thanks Gathering Together Farm for your continued donations of beautiful plant starts!).    

If you want to get in on all the fun, come out to a Tuesday evening work party! Drop by whenever you can, we're out there every Tuesday from 4 - 7ish we're doing a variety of tasks to help the garden grow and continue to provide food for those in need in Corvallis.

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Enjoy Supper at SAGE Next Month!

Supper at SAGE is just around the corner!

Join us for a magical evening of food, art and music at SAGE! The 2nd annual benefit dinner for the Edible Corvallis Initiative is Saturday, September 15th.

Supper at SAGE begins in the garden with appetizers by Fireworks, artisan pizzas from our cob oven, and tastings by 2 Towns Ciderhouse, Full Circle Creamery and Red Hat Melons--plus garden tours, music, and an outdoor art gallery featuring local artist Rebecca Waterhouse, whose art appears on the Supper at SAGE posters! A four-course dinner follows, prepared by Chef JC Mersmann of Gathering Together Farm and other local food artisans, with bread by Big River and desserts by First Alternative Co-Op, Le Patissier, New Morning Bakery, and Terminus.   Guests enjoy a complimentary glass of wine from Tyee Wine Cellars, with additional wine available for purchase by the glass or bottle. 

Tickets are $60, and are available through BrownPaperTickets.com or at the Corvallis Environmental Center's downtown office: 214 SW Monroe, (541)753-9311. Proceeds from the event benefit the Starker Arts Garden for Education and the Corvallis Farm to School programs.  More information on Supper at SAGE and our programs can be found HERE.

 Can't attend the event, but want to help? Volunteer for a few hours the day of the dinner! We still need help with set-up from 12-3, serving from 5-9, and clean-up from 8-10. There will be a mandatory orientation Saturday, September 8th at SAGE. Email paige@corvallisenvironmentalcenter.org for more information.


Sunday, August 5, 2012

Camp Time!

Camp participant harvesting green beans.
They harvested 6.5 lbs of beans for the South Corvallis Food Bank in just 10 minutes of picking!
Last week was the "Buzz about Bees" summer camp out at SAGE.  I have to admit I was a bit jealous to see all the kiddos exploring the bee hives, baking tasty honey bread, making beeswax candles and learning about pollinators......it looked like a lot more fun than the weeding and work the interns and I were doing!  In addition to focusing most of the week on bees, they also helped harvest some of the goodies that our buzzing friends collaborated with us to grow!
Teacher Amoreena and friend getting ready to do
some garden work!

We have one more camp out at SAGE this summer from Aug 13th - 17th.  "Roots, Shoots & Flowers!" focuses on taste testing and exploring the different part of plants at SAGE during the height of the growing season.  I know I'm definitely going to be jealous watching the kiddos of that camp!  If you're interested in signing your child or young friend up, there are still spots available.  You can register by phone by calling the Corvallis Environmental Center at (541) 753-9211 or you can sign up online by visiting our website.

Thanks campers for all your help in the garden!
                                                                                                                       Deanna (Garden Manager)

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Fall Planning and Ponderings

On a nice cool, overcast day (like today!), my mind wanders to fall, my favorite season!  Now is the time to think about fall and winter crops.  Previously SAGE has been focused primarily on summer production, but this year we're hoping to lengthen our growing season.  Root crops and brassicas (kale, broccoli, cabbage, etc) are perfect things to plant now for cool season harvest.  The great thing about harvesting them later is that frosts generally have hit before they're harvested and that brings wonderful sugars into the veggies.  Kale before a frost and after a frost are two totally different vegetables in my mind!     

Beets provide both greens and their sweet roots; so versatile! 
A wonderful crop to plant now for fall harvest.

Some plants you have growing nice and big right now just might continue to provide you food now and through both the fall and winter.  This is what our kale will do! It's GORGEOUS right now and will be able to struggle through and provide greens in the winter when we're all craving a reminder of the sun.  Chard is another that may last the winter although with our heat, sometimes it blots (goes to seed) before the coolness of the fall is upon us.


Chard!



Right now we're clearing out our blotted spinach, harvesting lettuce heads, and creating more space so we can begin to plant the winter crops.  More beets and carrots are high on my fall harvest list!  What's high on yours? 

If you are interested in learning more about what does well during the fall and winter, come to our "Planning Your Winter Garden" workshop Thursday, July 26th from 7 - 8:30pm at SAGE.  The workshop will be led by Master Gardener, Janet Throop, who will provide practical information and inspiration on how extend the harvest season. The cost is $5 – $10, sliding scale donation that supports SAGE programming. 

Happy Start to the Fall Growing Season!
Deanna (Garden Manager)

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Summer Swarm

While finishing up a few tasks on Monday morning, Lille (one of the new Sustainable Ag interns at SAGE) and I noticed a cloud gathering over the hive in our Bee Garden. The buzzing could be heard from 50 feet away!

For a few minutes we stood on stumps and were immersed in a blizzard of thousands and thousands of bees. Suddenly, and all at once, they began funneling down into three distinct balls on the branches of a nearby tree. Within the hour they had formed one large swarm, with a second small swarm on a branch just a few feet away.

Local beekeeper Payse Smith, a friend of Lillie's and an experienced swarm catcher, was in the neighborhood and arrived on the scene. Over the course of a half hour he and I managed to manipulate all of the bees into the main swarm and secure several obstructive branches out of the way with cords. Payse climbed a ladder and prepared to shake the bees off their branch while I held up an empty deep super for them to land in.

On the count of three he gave the branch several hard shakes and I was showered with thousands of bees. A few stings and apologies were exchanged between the little ladies and I, fairly enough, and in the end they happily accept their new found home. I am proud and excited to report that SAGE bee garden has gained a colony!


Follow up: The next day Karessa and I inspected the new hive and found they had already begun drawing a significant amount of comb down from the inner cover into the empty deep super. After some discussion about our options, we made the decision to allow the bees to continue to draw comb naturally from the inner cover but to also leave another super (with frames) as its base so as to create a kind of hybrid hive - not quite a top bar, but not exactly a Langstroth either. It is a fun experiment and only time will tell how things will turn out. Come visit the garden any time to watch their progress!

- Chris
(Garden Education Americorps Assistant)

Thursday, June 14, 2012

SAGE Soils!

Those of us in the farming and gardening world can be big dorks.  We like to geek out over seed catalogs, get really excited about tools like broadforks (a recent obsession of mine, I'll admit), and sometimes we compulsively check the weather forecast.  One of the biggest subjects of geeky contemplation is soil.  What type of soil do you have?  How does it retain water?  What do it's nutrients look like?  Flora/fauna?  pH? Those are just some of the big, broad questions about soil.....true soil dorks can get giddy over seemingly minute, mundane details that makes others worry we've been in the sun too long....

This spring (and fall 2011) SAGE was visited by some potential soil geeks in the making.  They were hard working soils students from OSU's Soil Science class (CSS 205).  Part of their project was creating a blog not only with soil info, but also information they learned out at SAGE.....I've been meaning to post it up here for months, so here it finally is! Check out their amazing blog by clicking HERE.   Thanks for your hard work soil students!  ~ Deanna and the Garden Crew
Soil students helping turn the compost pile

Soil students helping spread mulch over beds to add organic matter to the soil

Friday, June 8, 2012


Welcome to Corvallis NCCC Service Members!
These nine dedicated volunteers, from nine different states, are spending a year of service with the National Civilian Community Corps.  For seven weeks they are serving in Corvallis, improving food access in Benton County.  From May 21-July 11, 2012 they will be serving at SAGE, Dunawi Creek & Avery Park Community Gardens, South Corvallis Food Bank, Stone Soup, Lincoln School Garden, and Benton County Fairgrounds.  In just the couple of weeks they've been here, already they've been a wonderful help to the various programs.  If you haven't met them yet, come on out to a Tuesday evening work party and join us in welcoming them to our community!

To watch a great news piece done by the local KEZI television station on the team, follow this link:




Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Enjoy Supper at SAGE this September!

Supper at SAGE is a benefit dinner for the SAGE garden and the Farm to School program!


When: Saturday, September 15, 2012 from 4.30 pm to 8.30 pm
Where: The SAGE Garden and Bruce Starker Amphitheater at SW 45th Place and Country Club Drive


Celebrate a season in the garden this September! Supper at SAGE is our second annual benefit dinner. The evening begins with appetizers, cider tasting, and tours of the garden. At 5.30 guests are seated in the nearby pavilion to enjoy a fresh, seasonal dinner prepared by chef JC Mersmann of Gathering Together Farm, with wine by Tyee Wine Cellars! There will be live music throughout the evening and guests will have the opportunity to learn about how our programs provide healthy local produce and sustainable education to our community.
 

Supper at SAGE raises awareness and support for two essential programs of the Edible Corvallis Initiative: the SAGE garden and the Farm to School Program. SAGE offers sustainable agriculture education to the community while growing fresh, seasonal produce for local hunger relief agencies. Last year the garden donated over 7,000 pounds of produce! The Farm to School program brings fruits and vegetables from local farms into all elementary and middle school cafeterias in the Corvallis school district through monthly Tasting Tables. Kids also enjoy field trips, workshops, and classroom visits to learn more about healthy food and how it grows.

Tickets for Supper at SAGE are 60 dollars and are available online at Brown Paper Tickets

We hope to see you in the garden!


Monday, April 30, 2012

A Busy, Busy, Busy Couple of Weeks....


Thank you to all who have come out to SAGE these past couple of weeks, you've really helped up accomplish a lot!  To highlight the changes that have occurred, below is a brief photo essay of our recent installation of the new Children's Garden.  We have numerous youth groups visit SAGE whether for home school activities, school field trips (we invite all the Corvallis School District 1st - 3rd grade classes), summer camps or family mornings in the garden.  Our hope is that our new Children's Garden will be a wonderful, whimsical space that inspires exploration and creativity in our young visitors.  Feel free to stop on by and take a wander! 

The original state of the Children's Garden: Leaf piles, mucky mud puddles, VERY poor drainage and grass.

Wonderful HP volunteers who helped lay the ground work for the Children's Garden!

After some OSU soils students did some service-learning spreading the leaf piles, HP employees volunteered and helped get the main pathways in as well as shape Strawberry Mountain (the rise where the person is standing)

Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) from OSU partnered with us and helped win us a grant from Lowe's to install the Children's Garden.  Not only did they help us secure the grant, they also put in HOURS of work building the entrance tunnel, digging the pond, moving a lot of leaves, compost and mulch among a host of other things!  Thank you SIFE!!! 
SIFE students prep veggies from the garden to put on their cob-oven cooked pizzas.  There were a lot of hungry mouths to feed especially after moving yards and yards of compost that was graciously donated by Allied Waste/PRC and hauled by Rick Robinson Trucking.

View of the Children's Garden from the same vantage as the very first picture.  Now we have a pizza garden (foreground), a story circle, Strawberry Mountain (yes, it is covered with strawberries), a circle of blueberries (thanks Shonnard's for the discount!), a willow hut and a lot of growing and exploration space!

Thanks again everyone!!!!
Cheers,
Deanna
SAGE Garden Manager